A Secular Summer Retreat in Michigan June 13, 2011

A Secular Summer Retreat in Michigan

The folks at Center For Inquiry Michigan have their Fifth Annual Secular Summer Retreat July 22nd-24th, and it looks amazing. There will be games, hiking, biking, canoeing and kayaking.

It’s like Camp Quest for the whole family!

Early registration ends on Wednesday, so sign up now if you’d like to go 🙂

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  • Claudia

    Looks like a blast, and I’m glad to see events that are specifically oriented towards families. I’m all for non-indoctrination of children, but I also think that we have to do a better job of replacing the community institutions people associate with their churches/synagogues/mosques etc.

    On a totally superficial note, the “family photo” would make it look like nonbelief strongly correlated with not being overweight. Hardly an extra pound in the whole lot, and plenty are downright skinny. Odd, but probably totally irrelevant.

  • Man I wish I could afford events like this, it’s right in my backyard. Alas, I can barely afford the gas to get to the grocery store, or the groceries once I get there.

    Still, it’s good to see secular groups gathering together, if only to reinforce that there is community, and that atheists are everywhere.

  • I was at it with my daughter last year. She is even in one of the pictures. We hope to go this year also. It is so much fun.

  • Vanessa

    This sounds pretty awesome. I wish I had someone to go with.

  • While it does look really fun I’m not sure that I understand the need for it. It religion so ubiquitous in the US that a non-religious holiday environment is required to escape from the constant preaching? I’m really hoping that you’ll say “No, people just like to hang around with other people who hold similar views” or something because the idea of a nation as big and powerful as the US that is so caught up with religion is more than a little concerning.

  • OP Atheist

    hoverfrog, unfortunately it is exactly as you say here in the US. Especially where I live in the bible belt. We are up to our ears in heavy handed religiosity to the point where we need an escape, and badly.

  • Hoverfrog, it depends on where you live. In the Bible Belt, I imagine that such an escape is necessary. I live near San Francisco, and religion is not a big part of public life here. I can’t imagine that atheists would need to seek out other atheists for secular relaxation. A regular “family camp” would do just fine. I’ve been in lots of different environments over the years, and I’ve never encountered evangelical-style preaching, public prayer, etc. If people are religious, they tend to keep it to themselves. It would be considered very bad manners to question someone you’ve just met about their religious beliefs!

  • Cal-Mi

    ” It would be considered very bad manners to question someone you’ve just met about their religious beliefs!”
    Maybe in California. In west Michigan, new neighbors are not asked if they go to church, but are asked what church they attend.

    Atheists might be a majority in some states, but not in west Michigan.

  • Maybe in California. In west Michigan, new neighbors are not asked if they go to church, but are asked what church they attend. Atheists might be a majority in some states, but not in west Michigan.

    Atheists aren’t a majority in California. It’s just that, living near San Francisco, it would be considered intrusive/bad manners to inquire about someone’s religious beliefs. I’ve lived here my entire life and have never had someone ask me what religion I am, let alone assume that I’m Christian or attend a church.

    That’s why I said things vary so much from state to state. Where I live, there’s no reason for atheists to separate themselves. You can go camping without having to worry about Christians interrupting a fun, secular time by pushing their religion at you. In rural Michigan, this is likely not the case, so I’m happy that atheists who live there have been able to band together and enjoy a summer retreat free of religious nonsense.