Don’t Ever Consult the Stars March 27, 2011

Don’t Ever Consult the Stars

To anyone who has ever considered Astrology in making any decisions…

(via Rock, Paper, Cynic — thanks to Lauren for the link!)


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  • I frequently use the stars to make decisions about my personal life.

    Basically I look at whatever stars like Britney spears, LIndsay Lohan and co. do… and do the opposite.

  • Richard Wade

    I’ve used the stars on several occasions…

    to find my way back to camp, or back to my hotel in an unfamiliar city at night. One glimpse of a familiar constellation and I know the directions. It’s a nice little skill to have. Saved me more than once from a long cold night.

  • captsam

    yes Richard, celestial navigation can be very handy. ROCK, PAPER, CYNIC all so gives some good advice.

  • selfification

    Sadly, I am forced to accommodate it to an extent. Being Indian, you’d probably appreciate the subtext behind the words “parents” and “wedding date”.

  • i admit to having a soft spot for star-based planning. the ancients i studied were really into it, and they had a national party calendar that revolved around it, and there were a lot of dates/days off from work. and my sister has this book, and it tells one all the famous people with whom a birthday may be shared, and i thought it fun to know i shared a birthday with certain heroes and villains. sure, it doesn’t ‘mean’ anything, but i love playing with numbers and the calendar and star charts are fun ways to do so. it’s like mathematically smoking a doob or something.

  • Sarah

    I actually do entertain some ideas surrounding astrology. It simply makes sense to me. I think that lunar pull and planetary alignment can have certain effects on a person or their mood. Using vague horoscopes and consulting the stars to be a personal oracle or personality test, however, is silly and unnecessary.

  • @Sarah: If you have it, I’d like to see the scientific evidence behind the claim that lunar pull and planetary alignment have some effect on our mood. If you haven’t seen this evidence, then why do you believe it? Because it feels good, and your flawed common sense tells you it’s right?

    How is that any different from believing in a religion?

  • ACN

    It isn’t of course. They’re both irrational beliefs.

    This, incidentally, is one of the reasons why I really like Sam Harris’ opinion here. To paraphrase, that the goal should be clear, rational, evidence based thinking and not atheism as an end.

  • JB

    I like horoscopes as thought provokers. Like flipping a coin and then if you realize you want best 2 out of 3, you know what your decision is, a horoscope gives me something to agree or disagree with. I don’t care how they come upon the advice they give or if their advice is good for me or not, just having something to think about and evaluate enriches my day.

  • Sorry Sara, Neil debunks your claims in this video(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVk-2XAd-kI) and the moon is millions of miles closer than any planet, before you go pointing out that he said nothing of the planets.

  • Freemage

    If you use them right, most of these sorts of vague, clap-trap filled prognostication methods can be useful tools for contemplation and evaluation. Sure, the horoscopes are so undefined that they could apply to anybody–but that’s not necessarily a bad thing, if you treat it as a Magic 8-Ball (ie, a novelty item). The human mind is a tricksy thing, and sometimes getting a small notion (like a vague piece of advice about how this month is going to be good for romance) can give you something to build your thoughts on.

    That said, treating it in any way seriously is just asking for trouble.

  • there are a lot of people here stating quite matter-of-factly what they only assume to be true, but I doubt anyone’s taken the time to get to know the field beyond what these bullshit “astrologers” are proliferating in magazine columns (that isn’t astrology). astrology isn’t religious, nor are there any superstitions espoused as it isn’t tied to any belief system whatsoever.

    it blows my mind how many people they’re freethinking because of how much they’re willing to dismiss. it’s fine if you’re skeptical — you should be. everyone should be. I was for years. but then I started studying it on my own from experts in the field — as you should do, because it would be absolutely ridiculous to learn about evolution from a creationist. check out 17th century astrologer William Lilly, or William Ramesey, Abu Ma’shar, etc.

    unfortunately magazine columns have really distorted what astrology was really intended for, and few people realize the use that can come from astrology. for instance, horary astrology is a branch of the study that revolves around questions. “will I get the job?” or “where are my car keys?” I’ve literally watched someone find misplaced jewelry and cash utilizing astrology. a stranger drew up a chart and told the people exactly where these things were, using the symbolism of the planets in a horoscope. say what you want, but those missing things were found. there’s exactly great examples of horary astrology at work at this link: http://www.skyscript.co.uk/wit.html

    anyway. I suppose the point is that atheists are no better than theists when they start dismissing what they assume, or believe, to be ridiculous. maybe consider learning a little about the field first, then form an opinion.

  • There was a spate of superstition in our office involving horoscopes. Apparently the tradition is that you don’t read your own but get someone to read it for you. I can attest to the joy of deliberately getting then stars mixed up (or just making stuff up) and encouraging people to agree with the “stars” only to reveal the underhanded and cruel twist at the end. It put a stop to such nonsense anyway.

    Does anyone remember Greta Christina’s Oscarology?

  • perfectpatches

    I only use the onion horoscope. It’s so reliable!!!