How Can You Find Out if Your Date is Religious? February 10, 2011

How Can You Find Out if Your Date is Religious?

The dating site OKCupid has always been great for providing readers with data on user trends.

Most recently, they pointed out that you don’t always get to ask the questions you *really* want the answers to on your first date with someone.

  • Is he a drug addict?
  • Will she have sex on the first date?
  • Do we share political views?

Even though I’m sure some of you are very open about all these things before you meet someone, others may avoid “serious” discussions like this.

So based on OKCupid’s “match questions” that users can answer, they figured out what other questions you can ask instead so you can get an idea of the answers you’d really like to know about.

For example:

There’s a strong correlation between someone who likes beer and someone who is likely to have sex on the first date. Makes sense to me.

Here’s the one, though, that made me smile the most:

That correlation also makes sense. How many Christian commenters have you seen who turn on CAPS LOCK WITH NO REGARD FOR GRAMMAR or capitalize words like “Faith” and “Grace” for no apparent reason?

As we’ve seen polls indicate before, there’s already an inverse relationship between religiosity and education — the higher the degree you have, the less likely you are to be religious. The OKCupid finding fits right in with that data. I would imagine educated people care much more about spelling and grammar than the general public.

What other questions could you ask if you want to covertly discover someone’s religious preference?

My first thought was asking what someone’s favorite subject in high school used to be.

If the answer is Math or Science, you might have found an atheist. If the answer is English, you might have found someone religious. But that’s just based on my hunch. I don’t know how accurate it is. And it would seem to contradict the spelling-and-grammar-be-damned “result” from OKCupid, no?

(Thanks to everyone for the link!)

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  • Robert L.

    My favourite subject is English, I despise Maths and I absolutely love writing, but I’m still strongly atheist. Why English, any way?

  • Narvi

    The religious people I know used to hate religion classes in school. Too many facts.

    I still find it astonishing that Americans aren’t taught religion in school.

  • “What other questions could you ask if you want to covertly discover someone’s religious preference?”

    How about: Do you believe in a god?

    *snicker*

    Sorry, as a gay man, I’ve had lots of women ask me how they can tell or find out if a man they know/like is gay and I always respond: “Ask him if he likes having sex with men.”

    I tend to go for the blunt approach. If someone feels they have to be covert about their beliefs or are offended if you ask them what they are, they’ve already established themselves as someone I don’t want to date.

  • Delores

    But English was my favorite subject and I was an atheist. I work at my college’s writing center to tutor English and writing skills, even though I’m a Biology major. I can, however, see how you came up with your question; last year I worked with a christian fundamentalist who told me she enjoyed writing “christian fantasy.” I did my best to keep a straight face.

  • Oeno

    I have two BAs in English (Literature and Creative Writing), have an MA in English, and teach English and writing at the college level. I am also an atheist.

  • Emily

    As an atheist who is also an English Secondary Education major, I resent that! 😛

  • anna nonymous

    I am an atheist and I majored in religion in high school. (it was more comparative religion,almost like anthropology) I yet have to find a religious person who tries to hide this fact. On OKcupid I looked at questions like the evolution questions, Noah’s ark, is there a god, do you drink alcohol, sex before marriage etc. (and yes, I was contacted by a rather conservative muslim who thought I would go to hell)

  • Siobhan in Vermont

    This seems like a very strange example of someone taking correlations too far.

  • Tom

    I’ve never understood why such a trivial thing as misspellings can so inflame some people as to seriously give them a bad day over it. I’ve seen it, like major anal-retentive hissy fits.

    Maybe it’s because I’m an apostate, rather than a nonbeliever from a young age. I misspell stuff all the time and go “Oh, wouldya look at that!”

    Not like “OH MY EYES BURN LIKE HELL FIRE”

  • aketzle

    Yeah, I also have to disagree. I adore English and liberal arts (many of them, anyway) and despise religion. Also, there’s a logical correlation between someone who’s concerned with spelling/grammar and who gravitated toward English, right?

  • Adam

    “Do you feel your superstitious beliefs are grounds to deny others basic human rights?”

    But seriously, asking them favorite books, role models, type of music, whether they’re from a city or small town, etc. For favorite books, the more devout will always say the bible, and the role model is Jesus/Mary/Moses/God. Type of music is usually either Christian rock or country music. Small towns are notoriously religious (I’m from one, myself.) The more rural the more religious.

    Or, for a more direct/indirect approach, ask them what denomination/Church they go to. The non-religious will be offended, after which you can clarify that you’re non-religious, too. The non-Christians will say the name of their mosque/synagogue/druidic grove and then you’ll know.

  • Claudia

    I’m stumped, honestly. I can think of questions that would likely tell you if you’re talking to an activist atheist, but not an indifferent atheist or a moderate religious person. I suppose you could go for “What’s your most inspirational quote” or “Name a hero of yours”. If either results in scientists/skeptics you’re likely with one of us, and if Jesus is somewhere in there, you’re talking to a theist.

    Honestly though, I think it’s just better if we’re clear about who we are and what our expectations are. I don’t want to waste my time with a Christian fundamentalist and quite frankly I don’t think he should have to waste his time with me either. Better to be clear from the start.

  • Silent Service

    I’m dyslexic, I can’t spell, and I like country music. A lot of people presume I’m religious just because I own a Stetson. It’s always so funny to watch their heads spin when they ask what church I go to and I ask them, “Why would I waste my Sundays on mythology?”

  • Ellie

    I disagree with…

    “There’s a strong correlation between someone who likes beer and someone who is likely to have sex on the first date. Makes sense to me.”

    Were you being sarcastic and I missed it?

    I love beer, it’s my second favorite beverage after water and I won’t sleep with anyone on the first date.

    Perhaps it’s only christian beer drinkers who have sex on the first date. Someone should do more studies on this, I would be happy to participate if they provide the beer.

  • Bill

    “If the answer is Math or Science, you might have found an atheist. If the answer is English, you might have found someone religious. But that’s just based on my hunch. I don’t know how accurate it is” – Christopher Hitchens may have to come round and kick you in the arse for saying that

  • treedweller

    +1 beer drinker not inclined to sex on first date. (maybe if a LOT of beer were involved, but I’d hate myself in the morning)

    +1 English major skeptic.

    This all sounds like bunk to me.

    possible alternate Qs:
    What’s your favorite holiday?

    How do you like to spend your Sundays?
    Hey, I was doing this puzzle and got stumped; do you know the names of Jesus’ disciples?

    Really, I’m in the “How do you feel about religion” camp. Go Team Direct!

  • Well, obviously, this is silly. Back in my dating days, I wasn’t adverse to sex on a first date (especially if that’s all I wanted). However, I’m a teetotaler. And then there’s the punctuation/grammar/spelling thing. I’m an atheist who loves to spell. Yet, I never liked English in high school–it was too repetitive. I liked every subject except PE, but my favorite subject in high school was band. This dating article reminds me of “Men are like Mars, Women are like Venus” (according to that book, I’m a man). By the way, if you asked me about my favorite books, I would include the Bible, although I like it for different reasons than believers. In fact, I like studying religion (just don’t ask me to believe in it).

  • English major here. I liked English because it involved creative writing. I like writing stories because I can tell what’s fiction and what’s not. That’s why English was my favourite subject. A lot of religious stories are even more outrageous than general fiction.

  • Siamang

    But Hemant….

    You didn’t tell us. Do *you* like the taste of beer or not?

  • I’m really not interested in playing stupid word games to interpret whether or not they do or don’t hold a particular belief. I’d rather ask them outright. Is that rude? It isn’t like I’d ask if they spit or swallow.

    Having said that I imagine that a disastrous date could be made fun by playing this game.

    “I read on a website that people who like beer put out on the first date? How many beers can I get you?”

    “I read that religious people are bad at grammar. Want I fetch beer more you for?”

  • WishinItWas

    I struggled with math in high school, liked physics but did not overly apply myself. I also loved shop,auto-tech, and mythology class….now I am an atheist mechanical engineer.

    also, does the use of a serial comma help or hinder grammar? ha!

  • OverlapingMagisteria

    What does it mean if you are annoyed by people who don’t understand statistics?

    A number of the comments on the OKCupid site are along the lines of: “But I’m religious AND smart, therefore my sample size of one person invalidates this!” There will always be outliers that don’t fit the statistics, but they are rarer than the ones that do fit.

  • Speaking as a Christian, my experience at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was that the humanities are far more liberal than the sciences. Not sure why that is or what might be the cause, but that was my observation. Also, if memory serves, most of the people in the campus secularist/atheist group were in Poli Sci, Philosophy, English, or Religious Studies.

    Actually, I will venture one theory: The engineers were more conservative, but it’s not so much that they were devoutly religious. I think the engineers and scientists were very happy to confine themselves to their field and simply didn’t care about matters of theology, philosophy, or the arts. On those matters, they tended toward the default cultural mode. And in a red state like Nebraska, that’s a vaguely Christian conservatism.

  • LeAnne

    Jake Meador,

    Being from Nebraska myself, I’d agree that default is Christian conservative. Nebraskans unite. Haha.

  • Ibis

    “If the answer is Math or Science, you might have found an atheist. If the answer is English, you might have found someone religious. But that’s just based on my hunch prejudice against the arts and humanities.”

    FTFY.

  • Zadius

    Grammar and spelling mistakes do annoy me, but I hated English class. My favorite subject was math. Also, I love beer and I have no problem having sex on the first date, so I guess I’m 100% on those.

  • mark

    I despise English spelling. It is a horrible encoding system. If a spelling error results from applying the logic of the language as a whole and just missing a peculiarity. I’m not bothered.

    I have similar feelings about punctuation and grammar. If someone regularizes an uncommon irregular verb, I don’t care.

    I am also against the possessive apostrophe and like it when it is forgone.

    Just don’t use the wrong homophone.

  • I think the idea that religious people are bad spellers or that atheists have a lower tolerance of bad spelling is all just confirmation bias.

    We tend to remember the occasional religious poster that confirms our bias of religious people spelling badly. Also, there will always be some that throw a hissy fit when they see bad spelling. Since this is an atheist forum, we will see atheists throwing these hissy fits. We remember the hissy fits. Over time we may start to think that a high proportion of atheist are bothered by bad spelling when it may be no less prevalent in the larger population.

    I’m not a great speller myself, but I at least have the decency of running a spell-checker before I post anything. 🙂

    I think there would be a better correlation between rigid rule/custom-followers and religious belief.

  • Those statistics seem suspect to me, but not because I have contrary anecdotes. Obviously, my personal experience does not stand up to their data set numbering in the millions. Rather, I am worried that because they tested over 50,000 questions for correlations, some are bound to show false positives. I’m not sure about this.

  • Amanda

    As a history student who takes a lot of Latin American history courses, I tend to see many deeply religious folks in my classes. Usually those who are majoring in a foreign language (Spanish for Latin America classes) in order to be a missionary. But I also see a lot of atheist or questioning History majors/professors as well (including myself). I don’t know if subject interest is a good indicator of religiosity, since people approach these areas of interest with different motivations.

  • Don

    What do I ask to find out if she doesn’t trust me enough to say what she thinks?

  • David

    this is clearly bunk!
    People who like the taste of beer are more likely to have sex on a first date because they are men… or because they are drunk due to the cheap intoxicating substance they enjoy the taste of.

    I’m a dyslexic engineer and cant spell for shit but i am a strong atheist. I see no reason why there would be a link one way or the other.

    Peoples religious beliefs tend to have very little to do with their subject of choice. If they find conflict they tend to run away or ignore it.

    Btw i didnt spell check this like i usually would have. Just to prove a point xP anecdote ftw

  • Daniel

    ” If the answer is English, you might have found someone religious. ”

    Ugh. Degree in English, high school English teacher. Horrid rationale. I’d counter that most people who love language also love to read and that a broad spectrum of things read might increase odds of religion being something studied and rejected. Certainly a disproportionately large percentage of my classmates were Atheist or Agnostic, and in my credential program, the one and only outspoken Christian was a math teacher. (also, a big fan of WoW, which she played with her husband and son)

    You might as well say “Math gives the appearance of absolute answers without shades of gray, so religious people are more likely to enjoy math.”

    Not that I believe that to be an indicator either.

  • Roxane

    Even atheists can have brilliant high school English teachers, and if the biology courses were taught by misogynist coaches, well. . .

  • Anonymous

    The pursuit of truth is an elusive pursuit. Seldom does one discover truth through happenstance and much rarer is the recognition of truth discovered accidentally. Truth does exist. It is not found within one’s “self”. Neither is it found in proceeding through the “dip” with all the other sheep.
    Education is more than an extended stay in an “academic” environment. Let’s not confuse the sheep with the thinkers.

  • cat

    Considering that OKCupid allows you to filter matches by religion, if you can’t figure this it without relying on subtle correlations, you are pretty hopeless to begin with.

  • lilybird

    I have an MA in English, and my experience has been that people in the humanities are much more liberal and far less religious. The people I know with more practical degrees (accounting, nursing, things that can actually get you a job 😉 ) tend to be more religious.

    I like to think it’s because studying literature forces you to consider other cultures, changing belief systems, and the general complexity of life–none of which fit into a narrow Christian paradigm.

    As a freshman (when I was just beginning to leave the church) I had to read various creation myths in World Lit I. I remember thinking, “Wait a minute. What makes the story of Adam and Eve any truer than any of these creation myths?” That was the beginning of a very good thing!

    I also have a couple of Christian friends who started out English majors and then either quit or started attending seminary because they felt as though they were be “indoctrinated” by their professors. I’m not even joking. One of them even used that word.

  • Vas

    I am also against the possessive apostrophe and like it when it is forgone.

    Wow I’m kind of fond of those. In particular I like the plural ones, hanging out all weird looking by themselves at the end. I guess I just like the way they look.

    I’m super nasty dyslexic myself and tend to ramble and run on to boot. I have a comma monkey on my back. Writing is laborious for me, hardly three words go by without bizarre letter confusion that stumps spellcheck, (BTW FU iPhone auto correct) so I tend to cut people slack on spelling and grammar. My own short comings in the area are annoying, but other peoples’ not so much… and I’m an atheist, (and I really enjoyed writing that last bit).

    This whole thread is silly, but I’m enjoying it quite a bit. I liked Jake’s post quite a lot. Always nice to see non-trolling christian posts.
    V

  • littlejohn

    OK, none of the above is really important, but this is. A poll is underway in Fort Wayne, Indiana, asking whether a new building shoulb be named after Harry Baals. He pronounced it “Hairy Balls.”
    You all absolutely must vote for Harry Baals.
    Here’s the link:
    http://www.feedbackfortwayne.org/forums/96987-name-our-building

  • Erin

    I love OKCupid, I met my boyfriend there 2 years ago this month!

  • Chelsea

    As someone studying philosophy, I find that asking people about which philosophers they agree with is a good indication. Of course, it only works if they have a background in philosophy.
    I have also found the question, “What do you think of married women keeping their maiden names?” to be a mild indicator. Perhaps “No”=traditional, conservative ideas->religion
    However, I have met atheist men who still have traditional ideas of gender roles.
    I uncovered my co-worker’s religion by asking how she spends her weekends! That one is pretty straightforward.

    Also, I resent your generalization, Hement. I have always been an English/Humanities person.
    You know this new topic floating around the blogosphere of, “How do we attract more women/races/or generally any kind of diversity into atheist groups?” One way would be to stop assuming we’re all mathematicians and scientists.

  • LeAnne

    yeah, i think some of these correlations are stretching it a bit. plus, i would just flat out ask. if they’re a potential boyfriend, it’s pretty important to me that he knows i’m not religious, and if i’m really that interested in him, i’d hope he’d do the same.

  • Chelsea

    Also… almost all of my friends are atheists (by definition, though they may not be outspoken or identify as such) and studying the arts. However, I am one of the only arts people in my atheist club. I think that the idea that atheists are mathematicians or scientists is based on who these groups tend to reach out to, and who they tend to alienate. There is a huge arts demographic that is being left out here. But really, using that logic to determine if they are atheist or not is akin to saying, “If your date is a woman, she may be religious. If it’s a man, you may have found an atheist.”

  • Nik

    LOL, I like beer, and I’ve never had sex on a first date – I’ll barely hold hands on the first date!

    I majored in English in college (although I loved science and math, and majored in health sciences in high school – I wanted to be a bit better balanced), and I’ve been an atheist for at least 10 years (probably longer, I just didn’t realize it before).

  • Mak

    I’ve never met a religious person who wasn’t proud to inform me that they believed in God. No prompting necessary; if it’s a big part of their life, they like to talk about it.

  • elricthemad

    I am an unashamed beer snob aficionado, but have never had sex on the first date. My spelling is awful, yet i am not religious to the point of being anti-religious. Also, i intentionally do not capitalize “I” when referring to myself in the first person. This is a conscious breaking of a spelling or grammar convention. I would lean toward the direct approach, just ask them how they feel about religion. If you insisted on trying to puzzle it out without asking tell a joke like this one:

    The Pope is doing a crossword puzzle after finishing breakfast with some of his assistant Cardinals and Bishops and he asks his companions, “What’s a four letter word for woman ending in U-N-T?” One of them thinks for a moment before responding. “Aunt, your Holiness.” The Pope says, “Thanks, do you have an eraser?”

    If your companion laughs, they are probably not religious (at least not catholic.) If they scowl at you or slap you, you may have found a believer.

    I will concede they may either be offended at the joke, or just not find it funny even if they are not religious, so still probably best to just ask.

  • beckster

    I’ve been out of the dating arena for a long time (8th wedding anniversary coming up this year!), but I always found the direct approach to be the best. Just ask! I was probably an annoying date because I would ask loads of personal questions on a first dinner date with a guy. I would ask if they were religious, if they wanted children, where they saw themselves in ten years, and so on. If I didn’t like the answers, I would politely thank them for the date at the end of the night and shake their hand. Seemed like a reasonable way to weed out the guys I wasn’t interested in dating. Probably scared away a few good ones, but I ended up with the best man for me so I guess it worked out!

  • @elricthemad,

    You are a horrible male chauvinist pig. May you spend eternity in Hell with nothing to drink except bud-light. 😉

  • Joan

    Their conclusions seem silly to me. I loathe the taste of beer, and I was quite the… “free spirit” back in the 80s when I was single.

    Regarding spelling and grammar errors, one of my best friends is a staunch atheist and is quite the stickler for grammar/spelling. He got so annoyed by a typo on a major studio’s movie poster that he told me it would keep him from seeing the movie! (The intended word “lightning” was spelled “lightening.” I didn’t even notice.)

    Also, FWIW, I’m an agnostic and was never good at math. Music major.

  • Nordog

    I’ve never met a religious person who wasn’t proud to inform me that they believed in God. No prompting necessary; if it’s a big part of their life, they like to talk about it.

    So everyone you have met who hasn’t told you they believe in God is non-religious?

  • You know this new topic floating around the blogosphere of, “How do we attract more women/races/or generally any kind of diversity into atheist groups?” One way would be to stop assuming we’re all mathematicians and scientists.

    I totally agree. Not all atheists are drawn to math and science. Personally, I despised math and didn’t particularly care for science. English and Language Arts were always my favorite subjects. Maybe this is another difference between lifelong atheists and people who deconverted from a religion. It’s not that atheists are more likely to enjoy science, but that children in religious families who already like science are more inclined to question religious teachings that don’t match up with scientific reality. Since most children are raised in religious families, those children who are interested in science are more likely to become atheists later in life. We atheists who grew up without religion are probably no more or less likely to be interested in science than the average person on the street.

  • Tizzle

    What do I ask to find out if she doesn’t trust me enough to say what she thinks?

    Don, you should ask yourself why exactly she thinks you’re creepy. If I knew you, I’d actually say more. If this is really a problem, and not a joke in a blog comment, do what Dan Savage suggests (WWDSD is really a good way to live, period). He says that if you have a problem attracting other people, ask one of your brutal but honest friends to tell you exactly why. Give them 10 minutes of “I refuse to hold this against you later”.

    OK Cupid: I just joined, and there are a bunch of questions about believing in same sex marriage. Those were a no brainer for me, but should weed out the more repugnant conservatives. Also, the questions are okay, but just read what they say in their ‘essays’. Christians aren’t usually trying to hide their light under a basket.

  • Chelsea

    @Anna

    I doubt altogether that there is a causal relation at all between whether you were raised religious and whether you like math and science or not. Maybe for some super-fundamentalists who were raised to hate science this might be true, but mostly I just think that some people like math and science, some like history and language arts. Some like English and science and some like history and math. It’s just part of the infinite variety of forms that people come in, and probably largely due to the make-up of our brains, not our religious upbringing.
    Interestingly, I AM a deconvert, but I was not RAISED religious. I picked up Christianity on my own during my adolescence and my folks just let me do what I wanted. I also let go of it on my own. Religion was a complete nonissue in my household. I don’t think that had any effect on my preferred school subjects.

  • I doubt altogether that there is a causal relation at all between whether you were raised religious and whether you like math and science or not.

    I agree. I think there’s a correlation between interest in science and atheism, but not causation. It does seem that the atheist community is heavily inclined towards science, but I think many of those people were interested in the subject long before they became atheists.

  • You might be delighted to know that the study of English in college has one of the highest correlations between becoming atheist/agnostic in your college years.

    This was due to the fact that people who study science in college are already predisposed to atheistic/agnostic lack of belief. Interestingly, majoring in “education” had a positive correlation with religious belief in college. I can’t find the study right now but a search should yield this.

  • Josha

    “What other questions could you ask if you want to covertly discover someone’s religious preference?”

    No need to be covert if I am interested in dating a person.
    I say, “I am an atheist. What about you?”
    It’s the best strategy to use if you want to find out your date’s religious leanings.
    Another for Team Direct!

  • Chelsea

    Again, I think the high prevalence of science-interested people in the atheist community is more due to the kind of people the groups attract, not necessarily because there are actually more atheists in these fields. Because atheist groups, bloggers, and the “New Atheists” are mostly scientists, more people in these fields end up being outspoken atheists. I would wager there is a high percentage of quiet atheists in the humanities and arts.
    Even though I am more of an arts-type person, however, I do have a deep respect for science and am somewhat interested in it. For me, becoming as atheist actually made me care more about science, because I was exposed to it a lot more. My science interest followed from my atheism, not vice-versa. But for people who were interested in science from a young age, atheism probably followed later.

  • Jagyr

    “So, Hemant, do you like the taste of beer?”
    + 1

  • Heidi

    Simple. Ask them “Which movie do you prefer, Contact, or Signs?” If they answer anything other than Contact, (e.g. ‘I don’t watch sci-fi’) they’re not worth knowing.

    Oh, and I’m an atheist who will take English over math any day. And my favorite subjects were chorus & band. Science is good, though. As long as I don’t have to do math or dissect anything.

  • JB Tait

    Ask: “If you could take only three books with you to a deserted isle, what would they be?” I suspect that those who consider themselves religious will choose their sacred text as one of them.
    If not, you have a great ice breaker and conversation topic sparker.

    You will also be able to detect the willfully ignorant, because they will be at a loss to name a worthy book or will admit they don’t read.

  • Hm, I’m not so sure about that one. I’m very religious, and I care more about spelling and grammar than any one person should. If you’re on a date with a religious extremist, he or she might express indifference about those subjects, but if you’re on a date with a religious extremist, you probably already knew that… :] Also, in high school, I hated science and math because I just wasn’t any good at them, not because they offended my religious views. So those might not be the best litmus tests.

    If you really want to find out if your date is religious, ask what he or she does on the weekends. If you’re with a religious person, he or she will probably mention attending church!

  • JB Tait

    I wonder if asking them what adjectives they would use to characterize an atheist would indicate their tolerance, preconceptions, or leaning?

    You might be able to sort on responses like:
    skeptical, inquisitive, free-thinking
    vs
    evil, misguided, amoral

  • Vas

    Simple. Ask them “Which movie do you prefer, Contact, or Signs?” If they answer anything other than Contact, (e.g. ‘I don’t watch sci-fi’) they’re not worth knowing.

    Or I suppose you could ask them if they prefer “The Passion of the Christ” Or “The Last Temptation of Christ”

    If they answer “Road House” you have a winner.

  • Azkyroth

    Sorry, as a gay man, I’ve had lots of women ask me how they can tell or find out if a man they know/like is gay and I always respond: “Ask him if he likes having sex with men.”

    I would suggest asking him if he likes *dating* men, or finding an innocuous way of asking if he likes dating *women* since that would rule out gay, but not bi, men.

    As for the religiosity thing, I’m becoming a bit accustomed to this being stated up front, but questions about leisure activities or volunteer work might be one way of approaching it. “What do you feel most informs your values?” is a bit more direct but almost seems like phrasing from a job interview.

  • Liz

    Not English! Choir!

    I am an atheist and I loooove english.

    I also like the taste of beer, but wouldn’t have sex on the first date.

  • Kerrie

    Also signing up for Team Direct! I met my BF on OKCupid a year ago. He had the longest profile I’ve ever seen – took me quite a while to read, but he laid everything out there with no possibility of misinterpreting anything. Of course that took away quite a few “get to know” questions on the first date, but at least there were no nasty surprises that surfaced during conversation. He was very blunt about his atheism, and after reading so many wishy-washy agnostic profiles, it was fantastic. Not surprisingly he got few replies, but he got mine. 🙂

    I would like to know why, as an upfront atheist on my profile, I seemed to always get replies from Republican religious fundies who were at least 15 years older than me. Creepy.

  • GSW

    “I like to take off Friday afternoons and start the weekend early. What do you usually like to do over the weekend?”

    This takes care of the Friday people, the Saturday people and the Sunday people.
    Since I do not object on principle to dating a Thor worshipper, and I rarely get Thursday off anyway, I think that about covers it.
    @Julie:
    [sarc]Statistics – unlike the bible – only approximates the truth.[/sarc]

  • Serrin

    Back when I was religious, I was afraid I’d never find a Christian guy who could spell. When I found one, I married him – and now none of us is a Christian anymore. 🙂

  • coyotenose

    Kerrie said,
    “I would like to know why, as an upfront atheist on my profile, I seemed to always get replies from Republican religious fundies who were at least 15 years older than me. Creepy.”

    If you’re an immoral atheist, they figure you’ll loosen up enough for them to get in your pants by halfway through dinner.

    And if they MUST, they’ll even spring for the booze to help speed the process along. Everyone knows the godless go berserk for beer and floppy genitalia the way Hemant does on a field trip to a baby ranch.

  • Alex

    I feel as though enjoying English might not be such a strong predictor. There’s no reason to believe that science is the only path to atheism, and likewise there’s little reason to believe that math and science are a sure path to secularism. In my experience there are plenty of science majors (especially in biology) who buy into religion hook, line and sinker. There are plenty of atheists who look to history and philosophy rather than science to bolster their beliefs, Hitchens and Dennett are perfect examples.

  • R.

    Actually, a lot of fundamentalist religious people I’ve met love math because there is absolute truth in math (most of the time, anyway). They don’t like English or the other humanities because they’re subjective, and religious fundamentalism doesn’t leave a lot of room for subjectivity.