Explaining the Big Bang Theory March 15, 2010

Explaining the Big Bang Theory

Curious about the Big Bang and how that all went down?

ZOMGitsCriss has a nice video explaining the theory and the evidence in favor of it:

If you want a more in-depth explanation, Simon Singh‘s book Big Bang remains one of my favorite science books of all time.

(Thanks to Jeff for the link!)


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  • Jason

    And she’s hot too! 🙂

  • Deiloh

    Doh! I thought you were going to say something about the T.V. show. But this is good also, I’ve been following her vids for awhile.

  • Edmond

    Man, the ONE day I forget to bring my headphones to work… oh well, I’ll see it tonight or tomorrow…

  • ecorona

    outstanding – K’rina is always so right on, concise and direct – I love her! (and if she’s hot, it’s because she’s smart, outspoken and confident – get over the boobs you misogynist posers)

  • She is also starting to make audio files available online from an audio book on atheism she is working on. Links to the introduction and first chapter can be found from the “side-bar” at her YouTube channel.

  • @ ecorona:

    So being physically attracted to someone is akin to misogyny?

  • Pete

    I’m surprised no one has used the word “bang” in it’s other connotation in this thread yet….

    I certainly won’t. This woman has an extremely beautiful mind…..

  • medussa

    She is SO hot! Yes, because she is attractive, and smart, and in your face.
    And I would love to sit at her feet and listen to her lectures for hours. As it is, I’ll watch the videos.

  • DSimon

    So being physically attracted to someone is akin to misogyny?

    No, but feeling entitled to point out that attraction in contexts that have nothing to do with it (i.e. when discussing a woman giving a YouTube talk about a scientific topic) is off-topic to the point of rudeness.

    Imagine if everywhere you went, people were always commenting on your accent:

    You give a toast at a formal dinner, and someone else stands up and says “Thanks for the toast, and also your accent is really cool!”.

    You give a lecture on historical Greece, and the first student to raise their hand asks “Why does your voice sound so funny?”

    You’re applying for a job, and your interviewer asks you “Where are you from? Don’t get me wrong, it has nothing to do with the job, I’m just curious about your accent.”

    And on and on, every day… If you have an unusual accent, sure, people are going to notice it, but what’s rude is for people to think that just because it’s noticeable it’s therefore always relevant in any conversation to mention it.